CodyTalks at the...
140 conference smalltown 2011

"We Teach Them to Drive"

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Hot topics going on in your area

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CodyTalks Radio Show

CodyTalks at the...
140 conference NYC 2011

"How the Internet is like a Small Town"
...Twitter is coffee shop of the world... the whole world can now know about the good or bad thing you did just like it's always happened at the small town coffee shop.

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CodyTalks Public Speaking

What if we tried this...

Presidents can not fix this things... real people have to.

 

9 comments:

  1. Wish I could find the comment I wrote!!

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  2. Ok..here it goes again..It will not be as good as the one in cyber space somewhere!!
    Cody..I am convinced you are correct and I hope so!! Otherwise I would be scared to death!!
    I am turning 65 this year and sure wish I could just keep my BCBS that I have worked to pay for all of my career. I don't like change. MEDICARE....ME...IT CAN'T BE. But since it is I hope it is good. I hope it does what it is supposed too. I hope this not only for me but for my 90 year old parents. They not only have longevity genes but have made huge efforts to eat right and live without exposing themselves to some of the dangerous things out there. Abstinence from drugs, smoking,junk food obsessions etc have helped them become the way they are...healthy!

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    1. I think I am right too Connie... but yeah never know.

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  3. John F. Kennedy was just one man as well. Every 4 years we choose an inspirational leader. One person who helps set the direction of our country. Every decade has it's swings. Every generation has their greatness and downfalls. But for every Anthony Weiner and Todd Aiken there's just more proof that we're all flawed and especially our leaders.

    The gossip generation is upon us. The "social networking" generation is dividing us. We're realizing that there is an advantaged few that have taken advantage of the uninformed, the uneducated, the underrepresented few. The disadvantaged have learned to take advantage of the programs that are available. Should we blame them for relying on programs like medicare or medicaid, welfare, food stamps or unemployment benefits? Or should we blame the leaders that enact policies like these.

    The 45% who believe one way and the other 45% who believe another way are constantly tearing and ripping at each other. We feel like every four years we can change the way things are. A womans right to choose was decided in 1973. But every year we feel like we can change that law. When changes to the welfare system (Clinton's welfare-to-work) or medical system (Nixon's HMO authorization, Obama's Affordable Care Act) we feel like we should rise up and change them.

    The 60's brought an end to race discrimination, the 80's brought the savings and loan crisis, the 90's attempted to fix disadvantaged lending practices. The late 90's and early 2000's brought irrational exuberance followed by extreme privacy and personal freedom legislation (The "Patriot Act").

    Cody, it's not all good. It's not all right. It's not ever going to change until we stop the perpetual politicking. A corporation is NOT a person. One vote=one vote. A majority select our leaders and the minority should STFU until the next election cycle, which does not begin the day AFTER an election. We should limit political advertising for the 90 days preceeding an election. And people should be informed as much as they can in those 90 days and then BOOM! Election settled. Done. Every 2 years we select local representatives. Same thing there.

    As for the hot topic of today. We cannot discriminate against anyone if we're ALL created equal. The laws are there to protect the few. The gay marriage issue is one of personal privilege. Partnership rights, descendant rights, visitation and legal standing. It's not about marriage... it's about fairness. And if a chicken selling CEO gets more publicity for airing his personal beliefs than the millions of people who feel otherwise. That's the media's fault. He doesn't get to make the laws.

    But it sure helps piss people off enough to continue to destroy themselves with angst and misguided anger. And as a fast-food junkie who sometimes eats fast food 3 times a day. I haven't been to the Dr. in over 3 years. And my medical expenses are minimal. It's not the fat taking advantage of the system. It's the ignorant. Improve education in all aspects of life, money, health, science, social studies, history and you improve society. Everyone benefits from an education. But not everyone is educated. Fix that first. Maybe the 45% who will be upset at the results of the coming election in November should focus on educating the other 45% on why they feel the way they do. But they need to suck it up for 3 years and 9 months.

    Have a good weekend.

    -Ron

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    1. Ron, its a great comment and I appreciate the input.
      I do have to say that I think you understand what I was trying to say... just because you aren't going to the Doctor on a regular basis doesn't mean that its a false statement that a lot of Americans are abusing the system (food stamps/medicaid) with their intensely unhealthy choices over a long period of years.

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  4. First, I'll say that Cody I like it that you put things out like this from time to time and spark these conversations.

    I want to address two points in your video: The idea that all problems can be solved at the grass roots level; and the idea that our overall unhealthiness is behind out-of-control health care costs.

    Grassroots work can do much good. But it can not solve big problems or make big advances on it's own. The transcontinental railroad wasn't built by communities - and it wasn't built by big companies alone. It was a private/public partnership, where the government gave away land and subsidized the construction cost for the good of the country. Likewise for the interstate highway system. That's a federal project. Again with the space program, and the military. There was a time in this country where we did things that we thought were good for the country as a whole, and we didn't mind spending the money on them. We built the railroad and the highways, and we've become insanely productive and wealthy as a result. Instead of this all-government-is-bad-government approach, communities and individuals need to direct the feds to spend money in a way that does the most good for the most people. One could make the argument that such a program would be health care - but any reality of that argument is wrapped in the faux argument about whether our health care is being socialized and whether there will be death panels that kill off the elderly. Social Security wasn't a universally popular program once, but talking about cuts to SS is the "third rail" of politics - and even the most conservative amongst us wouldn't dare suggest that the program should go away. And for the record, most people get more out of SS than they ever pay into it.

    Now, on health care. Sure, the country should be healthier and that would reduce costs. But it's naive to think that's the only problem we have. The underlying problem is cost, and part of that is driven by this cat and mouse game that clinics and insurance companies play with either other - clinics overcharge knowing insurers will low ball them, insurers low ball knowing clinics overcharge. So there's little honesty in the system.
    I get furious on the health care debates, and my reason are very personal. My son was diagnosed a year ago with Type I diabetes. He'll require insulin his entire life. One of my biggest fears in the world is that my family could lose our insurance if we lose our jobs, and then I wonder how we'd afford insulin, insertion sets, blood glucose test strips, etc. I don't think my son's health ought to be tied to my employer. It's enough that a family would have to worry about its finances during a job loss, without the additional burden of worrying about how they will be able to treat a chronic illness. My other primary concern is that my son one day could be denied coverage for a per-existing condition. He didn't ask for this, there was no way to prevent it and now that he has it the only thing we can do is treat it. And without that treatment, plain and simple, he'd die.

    You are right, however, that one person doesn't solve the problem, and the president, who ever it is, won't be some magic tonic that will solve anything. In fact, for all the railing about Obama vs. Romney, in truth they won't effect much change either way. Right now in this country we're letting fear and uncertainty guide our thinking and our policy making. And people who are afraid do not make sound decisions. We need to start thinking about what we can do and what we should do to move forward, grow and prosper and then do those things. Because if we continue to allow fear to paralyze and control us, we'll find one that the rest of the world blew right past us while we were busy ringing our hands or tearing each other apart.

    Jason

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    1. Jason, the first thing I want to say is I tried to make it clear that I believe Gov. programs (even Fed programs)are necessary. And I never said all problems can be solved at the grass roots level. I do think all problems need more grassroots action than they are getting now... but I dont actually think any of them can be completely solved at the grass roots level.

      On Health Care... I think you agreed with me across the board. The only gray area is the overall effects of being a healthier nation. I contend the reason the costs are so high is because we have so many people putting a demand on the system. NOT people like your son, I said over and over again I think we need a system to guarantee that people that legitimately need help with a situation can get it... but if you are denying that you think that system is incredibly drained by people abusing it... I guess that surprises me.

      Social Security. All I would ask is for you to explain to me how "most people get more out of SS than they ever pay into it" works...? If "most" (your word) are getting out more than they pay in... how the hell does that sustain? I don't want Social Security to go away, but I do want it to not be the single biggest drain on our country that there is. And if minor reforms are made with legislation... the whole damn SS problem can then be fixed at the grass roots level.

      Your last paragraph I am right on board with ... 100%. All I would add is that the way to feel less fear is to make your own situation and that of your immediately neighbors more stable. Not placing any hope that Topeka or Washington D.C. is going to get rid of that fear.

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I love the discussion in the comments.. so... GO FOR IT!

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